Featured post

The Great Canadian Birdathon

The Great Canadian Birdathon is a fundraiser to help endangered species, and to keep common birds common. My webpage is here, or you can simply type birdboy.ca/GCB into your browser to find it any time. (GCB stands for Great Canadian Birdathon.) It’s that simple!  There is no designated amount to donate, so you can give anywhere from $1 to $10,000.

For more information, see here and here. To donate, go to my webpage here. Thank you for your important support!

Feathers on Friday

Western Bluebird

Western Bluebird

I was in Cranbrook for a soccer tournament this past weekend, and we went to a small pond called Fosters Small Pond, where we found a multitude of birds including a pair of Western Bluebirds.

Other Feathers on Friday:

Prairie Birder                                           The Cats and The Birds

Wolf Song Blog                                         Birds In Your Back Yard

Back Yard Bird Blog

Best Photos of The First Half of The Year

This post is for the photos, so I’ll keep the words short. All of the photos after a certain header are from that place/event, and they are the best that I took there. Enjoy!

CRANBROOK

Western Bluebird

Western Bluebird

Vesper Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

Mountain Goat

Mountain Goat

Western Bluebird

Western Bluebird

Mountain Goat

Mountain Goat

LONG-EARED OWLSLong-eared Owl Long-eared Owl

Long-eared Owlets Long-eared Owlets

JUNE FOURTH BIG MORNINGIMG_6369-3

Ruffed Grouse

Ruffed Grouse

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

THE BOWKAN BIRDCOUNT

Little Blue Butterfly

Little Blue Butterfly

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird

MY GREAT CANADIAN BIRDATHON

Black Bear

Black Bear

Black Bear

Black Bear

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Marbled Godwit

Marbled Godwit

Great Horned Owl

Great Horned Owl

BIRDING AROUND THE VALLEY

Brown Thrasher

Brown Thrasher

Brewer's Blackbird

Brewer’s Blackbird

EAGLE-WATCHING

Lynx

Lynx

Lynx

Lynx

ENGLAND

Great Spotted Woodpecker

Great Spotted Woodpecker

Brambling & Chaffinch

Brambling & Chaffinch

Turnstone

Turnstone

Pink-footed Goose; Brent Goose

Pink-footed Goose; Brent Goose

Certifying a Golf Course at 8:00 AM

After eight, we started seeing other people around the course. That didn’t bother us too much, as we were mostly staying away from the holes, and doing pretty well there anyways (read the first post in this series of two here). We found a nice little creek containing Red-eyed Vireos, Warbling Vireos, and 3 Cape May Warblers.

Cape May Warbler

Cape May Warbler

They flew in a large circle around us, pausing occasionally in a tree, so we could get some photos.

IMG_6369-3Going closer to the green, we saw an American Goldfinch, and heard a Lincoln’s Sparrow in a cluster of bushes and trees near hole 11.

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

A Tennessee Warbler sang from on top of a tree close by.

Tennessee Warbler

Tennessee Warbler

Almost back at the entrance, an Osprey flew by too quickly for a photo. In the pond that we had first seen, a couple of Red-winged Blackbirds were singing nicely

Red-winged Blckbird

Red-winged Blackbird

The other group appeared, and since birders are never competitive, we checked our numbers. 49 species was quite good, until we realised that they had 50. Considering everything, it wasn’t that bad of a result. the full list of species (including the drive home) is here. Thanks for reading my posts!

Certifiying a Golf Course at 5:00 AM

Every year, a bird search is conducted on the Livingstone Ranch Golf Course. This isn’t a legal requirement, but apparently the golf course is “Audubon Certified” if we do it. We went out, with the courses permission last Saturday, June 4th.

My Dad complained good-heartedly about getting up at 4:30 a.m. – don’t ask me why. It was a pleasant morning, still an hour to sunrise, but we could see quite well. Upon meeting the Calgary part of our group (everybody but us), we learned that they had seen a Grizzly in the middle of a field with two Coyotes. What’s with that, I wonder? We birded the area around the gates until we were let in by a man working on the golf course.

We found an American Kestrel, a Yellow Warbler and some Swallows around the gates.

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

We split up into two groups, one to go on the more plentiful north side of the course, and one for the south.
My Dad an I ended up going down the south side, but we started by walking along the ridge that formed a natural barrier between the two sides. Tossing down the occasional golf ball, we listned and watched, but there was not much around. A House Wren burbled ahead, and a pair of Grey Jays burst out from the tree-tops.

House Wren

House Wren

We stood for a time near a Sapsucker’s nest hole. We had seen a young bird, but it was fully fledged and did not come back while we watched. At the end of the ridge, we met a Red-tailed Hawk and a dozen Clay-colored Sparrows. Continuing into a small grove of trees, the leader of our group unknowingly flushed a Ruffed Grouse. He hadn’t even realized until I pointed it out.

Ruffed Grouse

Ruffed Grouse

The grouse strutted around imperiously, and for a minute it looked as though it might drum, but no luck.

Ruffed Grouse

Ruffed Grouse flaunting its tail feathers

Yellow-headed Blackbird, female

Yellow-headed Blackbird, female

An unexpected sighting came next. There are usually plenty of Red-winged Blackbirds around the course, but Yellow-headed? Not often. When a dozen females flew over, we were surprised, but when 20 males followed hot on their tails, we were excited. 30 Yellow-heads was the most unusual sighting so far.

 

At the back end of the Golf Course’s property, we found a pair of White-crowned Sparrows, some Savanah Sparrows, and a Wilson’s Snipe on top of a tree.

White-crowned Sparrow

White-crowned Sparrow

It was only 8:00 AM by now, so I will write about the rest of the morning later, to keep it kind of
short. So expect a sequal in short order!