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The Great Canadian Birdathon

The Great Canadian Birdathon is a fundraiser to help endangered species, and to keep common birds common. My webpage is here, or you can simply type birdboy.ca/GCB into your browser to find it any time. (GCB stands for Great Canadian Birdathon.) It’s that simple!  There is no designated amount to donate, so you can give anywhere from $1 to $10,000.

For more information, see here and here. To donate, go to my webpage here. Thank you for your important support!

My Great Canadian Birdathon 2016 #1

I had 46 spepcies before the Birdathon had even started. An owl chick, a mating pair of hawks and and a Vesper Sparrow were all things that I was not to be graced with during the count. But I would never have guessed what I would see during my fourth birdathon.

Great Horned Owl

Great Horned Owl

As per usual, I spread my Great Canadian Birdathon over two days, starting at 11:08 at Frank Lake on Friday, May 20th and ending at the same time on the 21st at the Cave and Basin (Banff).

Frank Lake… possibly the best birding lake in Alberta. The fifty odd species that I saw there ranged from Long-billed Dowitcher and Wilson’s Phalarope to Western Meadowlark and four types of swallow. We only went to the North West access point, where the blind is, but there are two excellent places that only take a minute or two to walk to.

Marbled Godwit

Marbled Godwit

We bombed at Blackie, where there are often two species of dove at the grainery, but we found nothing new but a Downy Woodpecker.

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Everyone knows  that the back roads are rich in birdlife, and only a little slower than the big roads. On 306 Ave east, we found seven new bird species. Least Sandpiper, Pectoral Sandpiper, Spotted Sandpiper and Lesser Yellowlegs made up the contingent of shorebirds, while hawks and harriers roamed the fields.

Swainson's Hawk

Swainson’s Hawk

At Langdon Corner Slough, Sanderling, Short-billed Dowitcher and Greater Scaup were amongst the newcomers. However, what we watched the most was the antics of a Foster’s Tern divebombing a Cananda Goose, trying to drive it away from its nest. This event, unfortunatly was too far away for any usable photos with my lense, so here is a photo of a different Forster’s.

Forster's TernForster’s Tern

It was a day for Swallows, as we found many in all places, but especially at Inverlake Road where over 600 of the birds were flying. In 1000 or so other birds, though we were not sure at the time, we have now confirmed a lifer there in the form of Semi-palmated Plover!

Pectoral Sandpiper, Red-necked Phalarope, Least Sandpiper, Semi-palmated Sandpiper, and Semipalmated Plover might be in there too.

Pectoral Sandpiper, Red-necked Phalarope, Least Sandpiper, Semi-palmated Sandpiper, and Semipalmated Plover might be in there too.

McElroy Slough was deserted because of its exposure to the howling wind. If I were a duck, I wouldn’t want to be out there.

We were worried for a time at Chestemere, for it appeared that the Purple Martins would not show until single bird fluttered over our car as we were leaving.

American Robin

American Robin

Uh Oh. 5:00 and we didn’t have a single Ring-billed Gull. Time to head for Glenmore Reservoir. Amongst the 500 Franklin’s Gulls we found three Great-Blue Herons, a Solitairy Sandpiper and, yes, four young Ring-billed Gulls.

Solitary Sandpiper

Solitary Sandpiper

We were not at Glenmore for Glenmore, though. We were there for the Weaselhead Natural Area right beside the reservoir. If you glance back through the post, you’ll see that it was mostly wetland that we visited, so the passerine numbers were rather low. An hour at the Weaselhead proved invaluable.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Female)

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Female)

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

And (supposedly) to end the day off, we headed to Horse Creek Road Marshes to try for Yellow Rail, Nelson’s Sparrow and Le Conte’s Sparrow. By a quarter to nine, it didn’t look like we would find any of them. But just as we were pulling out of the pull-out, I heard a buzzy “T-shhhhhhhh-t” as a Le Conte’s Sparrow sounded. And we drove home.

Or, I thought that we were driving home. My Dad had other ideas.”Don’t laugh, it might work” he says as we turn into Ghost Lake where there is often a Calliope Hummingbird. It’s 9:30 at night, and dumping a gallon of rain per foot per second. I laugh, but my tune changes when I spot a Rufous hovering around some bushes.

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird

But that’s not all. As we watch the hummer, something sings out from behind us. Not a song I’ve heard in (exactly) a year. It’s a warbler, and not the most regular, though it does not show up as a rarity in eBird. Chestnut-sided Warbler, to be presise. Try as we did, we could not see it, but the song is exactly right.

And then we truly went home.

Feathers on Friday

Brewer's Blackbird

Brewer’s Blackbird

The Brewers Blackbirds are back in town! I took this photo (and many others!) last Sunday.
There are also 3 Wilsons Snipe at the local creek, an unusual sighting, so I will try to get photos of them soon as well.

Other Feathers on Friday:

Prairie Birder                                           The Cats and The Birds

Wolf Song Blog                                         Birds In Your Back Yard

Back Yard Bird Blog

 

A Special Day

The Canmore Eagle Watch is a volunteer-run bird count targeting the Golden Eagle Migration. Everyday from late February to mid April and mid August to mid October. The purpose is to count all the migrating eagles and others that pass through our area.

IMG_3468

A Golden that was released a few years ago, after being treated for lead poisoning.

Last week, I was invited to join some of the people who were on duty on Thursday (April 7). I gladly accepted, and so it was that I was out of the door by 6:30 on the day. we drove to Hay Meadows, where the viewing point is, and were set up by 8:15.

Ruffed Grouse

Ruffed Grouse

There were Varied Thrushes calling every 30 seconds, a pair of Golden-crowned Kinglets and a Northern Shrike among many others. We didn’t see an eagle until just past 11:00 , but on the two short walks I took that morning, I saw Mountain Chickadees, Black-capped Chickadees, Northern Flickers and a Ruffed Grouse on it’s drumming log.

 

At about 11:45, our main observer was checking the temperature a short distance away and I was scanning the skies when the third member of our trio tapped me on the shoulder and pointed behind me. As soon as I saw it, I was groping for my camera.

Lynx

That’s right. A Lynx. Literally, a once in a lifetime experience.

Lynx

Lynx

That seemed to cost us some eagles, though, as by 7:00 we had seen only 3 Golden and 2 Bald, but, as soon as we had packed up our scopes, we started seeing them every 5 minutes! by the time we left (about 8:45), we had seen 7 more Goldens!

We ended the day having seen 10 migrant and 2 resident Golden Eagles, and 2 resident Balds. And of course, a Lynx.